Simply Remembering People and Places-the Best Kind of Blessings

Dear Reader:

Whenever I get overwhelmed by the problems of our world and country, I remember the parable of the sparrow… ( No not that scriptural one) … this one!

One day there was a sparrow lying in the street with its legs straight up in the air, sweating a little under its feathery arms. A warhorse walks up to the bird and asks, ” What on earth are you doing?” The sparrow replies, ” I heard the sky was falling and I wanted to help.” The horse laughs a big, sneering horse laugh, and says, ” Do you really think you’re going to hold back the sky, with those scrawny little legs?” And the sparrow says, ” One does what one can.”

Mother Teresa said that none of us can do great things, but we can do small things with great love. Anne Lamotte calls this kind of life … living “stitch by stitch.” If we try to fixate on the big picture, the massive uncontrollable global problems, the whole shebang… we miss the tiny stitching and suddenly everything around us begins to unravel. Instead we should pray to try to be good and kind to one another right where we are.

The best thing we can do for one another, as a blessing in disguise, is simply show up … for celebrations and tragedies, for recitals, sports games, illness and health, good times and bad.

Haven’t all of us felt lost at different stages in our lives? We feel like strangers in a strange land trying to figure out how to be human without losing sight of our real home… waiting for us at the end of our earthly visit.

And don’t we just want someone to share the path with us… to just be there if it looks like we are making a wrong detour and then to guide us home?

So until tomorrow…Father help us show up when most needed and be a companion and temporary guide to those who are lost!

Today is my favorite day-Winnie the Pooh

Discover the BLESSINGS on your path!

I love this quote by Martin Luther King, Jr

About Becky Dingle

I was born a Tarheel but ended up a Sandlapper. My grandparents were cotton farmers in Laurens, South Carolina and it was in my grandmother’s house that my love of storytelling began beside an old Franklin stove. When I graduated from Laurens High School, I attended Erskine College (Due West of what?) and would later get my Masters Degree in Education/Social Studies from Charleston Southern. I am presently an adjunct professor/clinical supervisor at CSU and have also taught at the College of Charleston. For 28 years I taught Social Studies through storytelling. My philosophy matched Rudyard Kipling’s quote: “If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.” Today I still spread this message through workshops and presentations throughout the state. The secret of success in teaching social studies is always in the story. I want to keep learning and being surprised by life…it is the greatest teacher. Like Kermit said, “When you’re green you grow, when you’re ripe you rot.”
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3 Responses to Simply Remembering People and Places-the Best Kind of Blessings

  1. Rachel Edwards says:

    Becky…so very true ….I told Suzy last March when she got symptoms that I would be there and on Dec 19th when she got her diagnosis I told her again…and for the last 6 months of her life we talked many times a day and traveled to NC at least twice a month and God blessed me by allowing me to be there at the end of ber life…in fact Clyde met me at the door and said she is waiting on you…hardest thing I have ever done but the most rewarding and spiritual time…kinda like taking care of Mom for 10 yrs…but the most gratifying…people who are not “there” miss out on so much. Love you.

    Like

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