A New Look at Going the Extra Mile

Dear Reader:

All of us know that “going the extra mile” means being willing to make a special effort to do or achieve something.

54% of bosses seek out future employees willing to go the extra mile. This expectation works better when management sets the the bar high by first putting in extra effort themselves and becoming mentors for their teams to emulate.

Jesus, however, had a different take on the reason behind going the extra mile.

Jesus proclaimed in Matthew 5:41 … ” Whoever forces you to go one mile, go with him two.”

When Jesus spoke about going the extra mile, he wasn’t referring to customer service but to a Roman law imposed on the people. The law stated that Roman soldiers could order any citizen to carry their weapons or equipment for a distance of up to one mile.

No matter what you were doing, the law required that you drop everything and obey. You can guess how people felt about that! So when Jesus said ” Whoever forces you to go one mile, go with him two, ” even if it goes unacknowledged… citizens shook their heads in bewilderment!

Don’t go the extra mile for material motives-expecting a raise or promotion-do it because you want to be a positive witness for Christ… for the glory of God!

In other words the gesture should come from the heart-not expected rewards from a calculating mind.

Today if we wish to show our true character and live a lifestyle of kindness to others beyond the norm… then we must ask ourselves if we are willing to go the extra mile as a witness to our beliefs. The world is always surprised when someone does.

So until tomorrow… ” You know what the nicest thing is about going the extra mile? It’s never crowded!

” Today is my favorite day” Winnie the Pooh

* Prayers please for Gingi’s sister Suzy… time is drawing nigh after battling pancreatic cancer! Suzy is tired. 🙏🏻

It is time to replace some flowers and plants with others who can better acclimate to Lowcountry summers-cone flowers, blanket flowers, dahlias and portulaca!

About Becky Dingle

I was born a Tarheel but ended up a Sandlapper. My grandparents were cotton farmers in Laurens, South Carolina and it was in my grandmother’s house that my love of storytelling began beside an old Franklin stove. When I graduated from Laurens High School, I attended Erskine College (Due West of what?) and would later get my Masters Degree in Education/Social Studies from Charleston Southern. I am presently an adjunct professor/clinical supervisor at CSU and have also taught at the College of Charleston. For 28 years I taught Social Studies through storytelling. My philosophy matched Rudyard Kipling’s quote: “If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.” Today I still spread this message through workshops and presentations throughout the state. The secret of success in teaching social studies is always in the story. I want to keep learning and being surprised by life…it is the greatest teacher. Like Kermit said, “When you’re green you grow, when you’re ripe you rot.”
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2 Responses to A New Look at Going the Extra Mile

  1. Susan Swicegood says:

    Loved the extra mile story. Your flowers are always so beautiful!

    Like

    • Becky Dingle says:

      Thank you Susan…so good to hear from you! While I was in Charleston today at Eloise’s dance recital…Summerville had a deluge…so I think the rain finally went the extra mile for me and my flowers… and I we both appreciate it. Smile pretty flowers!

      Like

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