Why Lowcountry Thanksgivings are Unique…

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Dear Reader:

Certainly one of the most unusual experiences about a lowcountry Thanksgiving is the diverse variety of spring, summer, fall, and winter plants all blooming at the same time!

I moved my two natural poinsettias from the thick adjacent driveway foliage to the front porch. Both poinsettias have survived a whole year without any help from their owner…I think the extra rainy season and mixture of cool and warm days did the trick naturally.

Several fall mums are having their second blooming and even the summer impatiens are continuing to bloom and glow. The impatiens were actually planted in late spring…so all four seasons of the year are represented on my front porch on this Pre-Thanksgiving day. My day to cook and enjoy the company of family and friends!  I can hardly wait!!!!

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Hibiscus, the red poinsettia, a fall mum and yes, even “Big Red” are still standing proudly on the left side of the porch….the close freeze didn’t get our red geranium Monday night or early Tuesday morning. Gotta love “Big Red!

The four seasons of the year are applicable to the lowcountry….even though we live in a geographically designated semi-tropical terrain. Our springs, summers, and early falls are longer seasons than other areas in our country…with winter being the shortest in intensity. *Residents from other parts of our country (who move here) sometimes complain about the long, hot, humid summers and short, late falls….but the complaining stops (I notice) with our, also, short winters. It is why people move to this area.

I don’t think I would like to live in an area that had no seasons….it is something about the four changes that keep us humans in sync with God’s time. I always feel energized as one season gives way to the next.

So on this almost Thanksgiving Day…I want to stop and wish everyone a wonderful Thanksgiving with the ones we love and if we can’t be with all the ones we love…let’s love the ones we’re with! After all…we are all connected in God’s eyes as “children of God.”

So until tomorrow: For each new morning with its light, For rest and shelter of the night, For health and food, For love and friends, For everything Thy goodness sends. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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“Today is my favorite day”  Winnie the Pooh

*And last night was my favorite night…I was taking my garbage out since our neighborhood has pick-up on Wednesdays and the bright light filtering through the tree branches made me stop mid-way to marvel at the delicious Harvest Moon in all its beauty. “Shine on…shine on Harvest Moon…up in the sky…”

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John, Mandy, Eva Cate, and Jakie flew home to John’s parents in Huntsville, Alabama for Thanksgiving…I know they are having a marvelous time! Mandy texted to let me know everyone had arrived safe and sound. I told her to take the kids outside and check out the moon…Tell Eva Cate that Boo is watching the same moon she is and sending her love from it.

 

About Becky Dingle

I was born a Tarheel but ended up a Sandlapper. My grandparents were cotton farmers in Laurens, South Carolina and it was in my grandmother’s house that my love of storytelling began beside an old Franklin stove. When I graduated from Laurens High School, I attended Erskine College (Due West of what?) and would later get my Masters Degree in Education/Social Studies from Charleston Southern. I am presently an adjunct professor/clinical supervisor at CSU and have also taught at the College of Charleston. For 28 years I taught Social Studies through storytelling. My philosophy matched Rudyard Kipling’s quote: “If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.” Today I still spread this message through workshops and presentations throughout the state. The secret of success in teaching social studies is always in the story. I want to keep learning and being surprised by life…it is the greatest teacher. Like Kermit said, “When you’re green you grow, when you’re ripe you rot.”
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4 Responses to Why Lowcountry Thanksgivings are Unique…

  1. Johnny Johnson says:

    Happy Thanksgiving Mrs. Dingle! Still loving your blog every morning starts off with Chapel of Hope Stories. You make my day, every day, and for you and your stories, I am THANKFUL!

    Like

  2. Becky Dingle says:

    Thanks Johnny for making my day….a Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family…so glad you are such a strong supporter of the blog blessings!

    Like

  3. Jo Dufford says:

    Hope you have a wonderful day tomorrow. I have so much and so many people to be thankful for, and I just wanted to say to you again, “Thanks for taking so much time to write your messages for all of us and for taking those phenomenal pictures.” HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

    Like

  4. Becky Dingle says:

    You are my most loyal and funny supporter….you pull me up when I am down….Happy Thanksgiving to you and your wonderful family!

    Like

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